SCRAPPED

Despite what was said when the Taku was sold, she headed straight for the beach at Alang.
(Inset photo)

This photo shows the sad end to a beloved Alaska ferry
Ellis # 1837
"Winslow--Wash"

Taken in the early 60's, the aerial shot of Winslow, Bainbridge Island
shows the ferry
Tillikum at the Eagle Harbor dock.  By this time,
plans were underway to greatly expand service on the run, as by now
the
Illahee and Tillikum were already being outpaced by traffic.

At left, tied up at the state yard are the
Chippewa, which looks to be
fired up and probably about to be pressed into extra service, the
San
Mateo
and Leschi.  All three were extra service ferries at that point,
all of them finding regular work during the busy summer months.  
Chippewa would either be sent to the San Juan Islands or work the
Winslow route.  The
San Mateo would provide extra capacity at
many of the central sound routes, spending time at Vashon Island, on
the Winslow run and crossing between Kingston and Edmonds.  The
Leschi,  a funky little boat with restrictions on where she could sail
due to her hull configuration, would work either at Vashon or most
often between Mukilteo and Columbia Beach.

All thee ferries would soon be retired.  The
Chippewa would be first
in 1964.  The
Leschi would follow in 1967 and the San Mateo in 1969.

Going Electric
“We’d like to put the first vessel into service by the summer season two years from now,” said Matthew von Ruden, director of vessels for Washington State Ferries, when asked about the time line to
electrify the
Puyallup, Wenatchee, and Tacoma.

On paper, it makes sense.  The Jumbo Mark II's account for an astonishing 26% of all diesel and fuel emissions for the entire fleet.  

Happily, WSF and the DOT is consulting with Norway, the world leader in the development and application of electric technology in transportation.

Photo by the Author.
Queen of Cumberland accident has continued fallout

An earlier accident on the
Queen of Cumberland is creating additional problems.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Swan

$15K booking cancelled due to Galiano Island ferry service
disruption, says local business

Stop it, already
Please, people, pick up your stuff and don't leave your packages laying around.  There's enough chaos at Colman Dock
right now with the construction going on.

Author's collection.

Colman Dock ferry terminal reopens after evacuation for
suspicious package
The Grand Staircase

They came of age in the late 1800's on the transatlantic liners--the grand staircase.  Not only functional, they served the purpose of being
able to make an entrance, typified by several scenes in
Titanic.  That particular ship had probably the most well-known grand staircase, due
mostly to infamy rather than actual grandeur, as not only was it an exact copy of one that already existed on sister ship
Olympic, there were
far more sweeping and elaborate both before and after the
Titanic.  (In turns of pure intricacy, few could outdo the French.  It's doubtful
that few ships ever surpassed the staircase of the
Normandie, which looked like a huge Art Deco Hollywood movie set.)

"Pocket Liners" of both coasts also had notable staircases. Nearly all Canadian Pacific's West Coast liners had beautiful main staircases, as
did many of the steamers plying the waters of the East Coast.

One of those ships eventually made its way to California was the S.S.
Asbury Park, a crack steamer built in 1903, known for casting a
huge, swamping wake due to its speed while crossing between New Jersey and New York.  She was sold to Monticello Steamship
Corporation of San Francisco in 1919, which converted the passenger steamer into a car ferry.

In 1925, the company renamed the ferry
City of Sacramento.  She was rebuilt in 1926, greatly changing her appearance.  
The bow and stern were removed to facilitate end loading of automobiles.  The main deck was widened to 67 feet, and a  new wheelhouse
and bridge were built above the original one.  The rebuilding of the ferry dropped  passenger capacity  to 2,027, down from 2,375, but still a
great number of passengers for vessel of her size.   More importantly, her auto carrying capacity rose to 100 from 60, making her the
largest auto ferry on the east coast.

What didn't change was her beautifully carved grand staircase, seen at left.  The only real change to the area was the addition of the painting
of the state capitol building at, appropriately enough, Sacramento.

The ferry made her way to Puget Sound in 1944 and was put to work on the Seattle-Bremerton route.  Traffic was at an all-time high on the
route due to the war and work going on at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.  The big ferry joined the
Chippewa, Kalakala, Enetai, Willapa
and Malahat, making it the first and probably only time the route was served by six ferries.

While the ferry would continue sailing until 1976, the staircase did not survive.  The
City of Sacramento  was taken to Yarrows yard  in
British Columbia in 1951 and stripped down to the hull.  She emerged in 1952 as the
Kahloke, a practically new vessel that looked nothing
like the old
City of Sacramento.

It is not known if any interior photos of the
Kahloke exist.
SPRING
** Standard disclaimer --may not be completely
current due to maintenance needs, etc.

Spring schedule runs from 1 April
2018 to 23 June 2018


ANACORTES - SAN JUAN
ISLANDS
 
HYAK-YAKIMA-CHELAN
TILLIKUM (Inter-island)

ANACORTES - SIDNEY
CHELAN

PORT TOWNSEND -
KEYSTONE
KENNEWICK
SALISH

(2 boat service begins 13 May,
2018)
MUKILTEO - CLINTON
TOKITAE
KITTITAS

EDMONDS - KINGSTON
PUYALLUP
SPOKANE

SEATTLE - WINSLOW
( AKA Bainbridge Island)
TACOMA
WENATCHEE

SEATTLE - BREMERTON
KALEETAN
WALLA WALLA/CHIMACUM

SOUTHWORTH -VASHON -
FAUNTLEROY
CATHLAMET
ISSAQUAH
SEALTH

POINT DEFIANCE -
TAHLEQUAH
CHETZEMOKA
STANDBY- IN THE YARD
ELWHA



FOR SALE
Nothing at this time, though the Klahowya will likely be
listed soon
Previous Day Room