And speaking of trouble...

The Columbia spent some unwanted time sidelined at the end of January...

Photo courtesy of  AMH.

Southeast’s main ferry is out of service
Ellis # 1005
"Black Ball Motor Ferry
"Kalakala" World's First
streamlined Ferry Seattle to
Bremmerton-Wash"

For a life-long resident of Washington State, Ellis' spelling was
often suspect.  Case in point, # 1005, a lovely shot of the
Kalakala, on what appears to be a summer day, given the
number of people on deck.  It also appears to be in her first
year of service as there are no braces holding up the "Flying
Bridge."

While it is understandable that Ellis would vary "Whidby" and
"Whidbey" which happened quite a lot in the 20's and 30's
(Black Ball brochures of the period waver back and forth) and
even getting "Sedro Woolley" incorrect, one does wonder why
Mr. Ellis seemed to think that "Bremerton" needed that extra
letter "M."
Decommissioning the Hyak
The end of the Supers comes as no surprise to those who work and commute on
the boats.  Even the three refurbished vessels have a backlog of work.  The
Hyak
alone needs $37 million,
according this article in the Islands Sounder.
The other four vessels in the fleet--Yakima, Kaleetan and Elwha need an
estimated $23 million dollars each; the
Elwha likely needs more than that figure
alone in steel replacement.  Her night of bashing the pier in Everett way back in
1990 "Arctic Express" is catching up to her.  Even though roughly one side of the
vessel was replaced, the steel is corroding at a rapid rate.
With the
Suquamish coming online this year, it does make a certain degree of
sense to remove one of the Supers from regular service.  Ferry patrons hope that
the mistake of decommissioning a boat during the busy summer months doesn't
happen again.  2017's fiasco could have been lessened to a great degree if the
Klahowya had been kept at the ready until fall or winter schedule started.  Yes, it
would cost money to keep the boat in an at-ready state, but how many millions of
dollars were there in lost revenue in the San Juan Islands, Vashon, etc last
summer?
On a personal note, I'm going to miss the
Hyak.  She's been a steady runner, and
the time-warp effect of that 1967 interior always brings a smile--even if they
were quite possible the most uncomfortable chairs every placed on a WSF
vessel.  (Well, no, that title belongs to the teacups chairs that used to be on the
Spokane and Walla Walla.)
Time catches up to us all, particularly if you've been running steadily for over
fifty years, nearly seven days a week, nearly 365 days a year--and soaking in salt
water the entire time.
Now that sounds better!

A  ferry fan noticed the Queen of New Westminster's whistle was out of tune.  B.C. Ferries responded promptly.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Swan.

Tooting their own horn: keen ears help restore out-of-tune BC
ferry pipe

Trouble on the triangle route

Bigger boats mean longer dwell time, something that hasn't been built into the existing schedules at Vashon, which was
designed for the
Issaquah,(124 cars)  Klahowya, (88 cars)  and Quinault. (65 cars)  With two, and soon to be three Issaquah
124 class vessel on the route, and a too-small dock at Fauntleroy, troubles on the Vashon "triangle" route are building.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Swan.

New ferry report: Economists analyze data, suggest change
First Class Stateroom, S.S. Princess
Kathleen

The remains of this room are now under the cold waters of Lynn Canal.

Canadian Pacific's "pocket liners" were very much like their trans-Atlantic counterparts, only
smaller in size.  This first class state room on board one of the lines loveliest liners, the S.S.
Princess Kathleen wouldn't have looked out of place on the "Atlantic Ferry."

The
Kathleen survived World War II, but her sister, the nearly identical and equally lovely
Princess Marguerite did not.  As a result the Princess Kathleen was orphaned of her proper
running mate on the famed "Triangle Route" between Seattle, Vancouver and Victoria.  She
continued on the route for a while, paired with the elderly
Princess Victoria or equally elderly
Princess Charlotte. Neither vessel matched the Kathleen in size or accommodation.  

A pair of pocket liners had been planned before the outbreak of the war, but had been delayed
for obvious reasons.  With peace restored, Canadian Pacific went ahead with their plans.  
While the resulting liners were lovely ships, they were also clearly of a different era and were
not built to meet the changed dynamic of traffic on the triangle route.  While the new
Princess
Marguerite
and Princess Patricia ultimately had long, successful careers, there was no
denying that they were hopelessly dated from the moment they went into service in 1948.

With the new sisters on the triangle route, the
Princess Kathleen turned to cruising to Alaska,
a venue she was highly successful on until the night of 7 September 1952 when she went
aground on Lena Point.  All attempts to free her failed, and the lovely ship slipped beneath the
waves just hours later.
Winter
** Standard disclaimer --may not be completely
current due to maintenance needs, etc.

Winter  schedule runs from 7
January 2018 to 31 March 2018


ANACORTES - SAN JUAN
ISLANDS
 
ELWHA - SAMISH - CHELAN
TILLIKUM (Inter-island)

ANACORTES - SIDNEY
Suspended until 1 April 2018

PORT TOWNSEND -
KEYSTONE
KENNEWICK

MUKILTEO - CLINTON
TOKITAE
KITTITAS

EDMONDS - KINGSTON
PUYALLUP
WALLA WALLA

SEATTLE - WINSLOW
( AKA Bainbridge Island)
TACOMA
WENATCHEE

SEATTLE - BREMERTON
KALEETAN
CHIMACUM

SOUTHWORTH -VASHON -
FAUNTLEROY
CATHLAMET
ISSAQUAH
SEALTH

POINT DEFIANCE -
TAHLEQUAH
CHETZEMOKA
STANDBY- IN THE YARD
YAKIMA
SPOKANE
HYAK
FOR SALE


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