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Quinault, in the early Washington State Ferries years...
   The Quinault, working the Harper-Vashon-Fauntleroy route, is looking in good in her new WSF livery, but still sporting her large windows on the car deck from her days with Black Ball and before that, the Southern Pacific-Golden Gate Ferry Company on San Francisco Bay.  Constantly breaking, WSF welded in steel plates over the large windows, leaving an iconic open porthole along the deck, a recognizable feature of the Steel Electrics the rest of their career.  
Photo by Howard Willsie, courtesy of Candace Brown.
Together again...
The
Chelan and Yakima spent years working the Edmonds-Kingston run in the early 1980's. Traffic finally outpaced the Chelan  (then a 100 car ferry) and the Hyak was put alongside the Yakima. Eventually the route would become too busy for even the Supers, and a Jumbo and Jumbo Mark II were placed on the run.  The former "Kingston boats" now find themselves working together  in the San Juan Islands for much of the year these days.   Courtesy of Brandon Swan.
The Mount Baker Lodge...again*!
     
he Mt. Baker Lodg e, which opened to a g rand celebration on July 14, 1927. Total cost for the resort was $500,000. Each of the 100 guest rooms had hot and cold running water and a telephone. Fir pillars supported cathedral ceilings, cedar shakes covered the roof and interior walls. The lodge even had a hydroelectric power plant on Bagley Creek.

The Forest Service estimated that 11,700 guests visited the lodge its opening year. Hollywood stars were among them when William Fox Films shot
Wolf Fangs there. In 1928, a 32-room annex was built to increase capacity.

By 1929, the highway department finished the road 3 miles beyond Heather Meadows to Artist Point. The 58-mile Mount Baker Highway finally was
completed at a cost of $800,000.
At 5:20 a.m. on Aug. 5, 1931, tragedy struck Mt. Baker Lodge. An electrical fire swept through the main hotel, igniting an oil tank and sending flames 1,000 feet into the air. By 7:45 a.m. the building was gone. Fortunately, no lives were lost. Guests were housed in the annex, and the
resort stayed open through the Depression, though it was falling into disrepair.

A last “hurrah” came in 1934 when Twentieth Century Pictures chose Heather Meadows and the Nooksack River to film
Call of the Wild. Cast and crew stayed at the annex.
* I usually don't repeat the historic places, but this was such an unusual photo of the Lodge I thought it was worth it.  This is only the second photo I've ever seen taken of the observation tower.  The lodge was most commonly photographed from the other side.  Note the deck is packed with guests taking in the spectacular views.
Author's collection.
SPRING!
Subject to change at any time/ Reflect assigned routes and may not be the current situation!
Spring schedule begins 24 March, 2013.

ANACORTES-SAN JUAN ISLANDS:
Elwha
Chelan
Yakima



ANACORTES-SIDNEY:
Chelan

SAN JUAN INTERISLAND:
Evergreen State

MUKILTEO-CLINTON
Cathlamet
Kittitas


PORT TOWNSEND-KEYSTONE
Kennewick

KINGSTON-EDMONDS
Spokane
Puyallup

SEATTLE-BAINBRIDGE
Tacoma
Wenatchee


SEATTLE-BREMERTON
Hyak
Kitsap
FAUNTLEROY-VASHON-SOUTHWORTH
Issaquah
Tillikum
Klahowya/Sealth



POINT DEFIANCE-TAHLEQUAH
Chetzemoka

STANDBY/IN THE YARD
Hiyu
Walla Walla
Kaleetan
Salish




End of the Princess Elizabeth...
The Princess Elizabeth is shown here leaving Seattle for the last time in February, 1959.  The CPR steamer was replaced by the Princess Marguerite & Patricia, and the route trimmed down to summers only.  The Elizabeth and sister Joan would end their careers in Greece serving as cruise ships.  Author's photo.
Keystone Harbor: Worst in the ferry system.
Even under the best of conditions, Keystone Harbor is tricky to navigate.  When the Klickitat lost power abruptly in September, 1989, there was nothing to be done but ground the ferry as gently as possible.  As a rule, the other side of the harbor is a preferable landing spot, as the shore there is more forgiving where the breakwater is not.  Happily, there was little damage done to the Klickitat.   Author's collection.
Winter wandering for the Yakima...
   With the Walla Walla ailing, the scramble was on to get maintenance done on the fleet with as little distruption as possible.  The Yakima, which normally calls the San Juans home, stood in at both Bremerton and Kingston this winter.  She is seen here on a lovely twilight evening with the Tacoma. Photo courtesy of Guy de Gouville.
Answer for February!
The Catala!

DAY ROOM ARCHIVES


JANUARY 2013
FEBRUARY 2013

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Anacortes tie up slip, and a vistor.

  
Happily since this photo was taken in 2010 the Yakima has been painted.  The Steilacoom II, recently released from her service at Port Townsend, was on her way to Dakota Creek for an overhaul before being returned to Pierce County for her usual assignment between Steilacoom and Anderson Island.   Photo courtesy of Brandon Moser.

Mystery vessel for March
She had a near sister, but not identical.  Today, her name is more well-known as a beverage than a ferry.


Any ideas?
Email me here!
The handwriting on the wall...

  Marine Digest reported in February, 1951 of Captain Peabody's plans for his Canadian ferry service. 
The previous few years, PSN had been fighting a battle with the state of Washington over ferry service on Puget Sound.   The state won the battle, basically forcing the private company out of business.  Washington State Ferries took over from Black Ball on 1 June, 1951
.